Stitching Up a Little Comfort

The most meaningful antique my mother ever owned was an 1800’s Lincoln rocker. First belonging to her great-aunt Nellie, eventually it was inherited by my grandma. For many years, Mother remembered watching her own mom rest and rock in the chair after a day’s hard work. When the sad time came to close up Grandma’s house in Sisters, Oregon, I knew the rocker was about to find a home in California.

Overjoyed to have the treasure at last, Mother and Daddy refreshed the cherry-wood arms and graceful rockers, then recovered the tattered upholstery. Newly dressed in green Damask, with just enough blue sheen to hint there was a peacock in the room, Mother found the rocking chair irresistible.

Except for one thing. Once seated, Mother was too petite for her feet to find the floor unless she rocked forward. Aggressively. But what if she wanted to relax and read? Or sew? Or file her nails? Without her feet dangling mid-air?

After some thought, Mother purchased a little stool-kit. The dark stain went well with the rocker’s cherry-wood color. And even better – there was a needlepoint project in the mix. The cushion cover was stamped with a pattern of roses and leaves. All in Mother’s favorite fall colors of yellow, peach, and green, perfectly enhancing the rocker’s new Damask upholstery. As if waiting for her careful hand to bring the needlepoint bouquet to life.

I’d never known Mother to attempt needlepoint. But she jumped right in, doing precise work. Once finished, she set the stool in front of the beloved Lincoln rocker. Making herself comfortable, Mother arranged her feet on the little stool and smiled the smile of accomplishment. And of comfort.

Nice first try on Needlepoint, Mother!

From that day forward, the stool was always pushed just under the rocker when not in use and pulled out when needed. She used it daily for more years than I can remember; yet the stool still looks charming. A little worn, perhaps. But for me, the wear is a precious reminder of the comfort it gave my dear Mother for so long.

I think I’ll just leave it be and push it back under the old Lincoln rocker – now mine – right where it belongs.

8 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

8 responses to “Stitching Up a Little Comfort

  1. Judy Saunders

    Such a comforting little story to go the stool and rocker. I inherited a beautiful old rocker and I really would like to get it refinished and the seat came with a new needle point cover. Someday soon.

    • How lovely that you inherited that old rocker. Sounds like you are halfway to restoration, yes? A good goal for 2021. Thank you so much for your comment. And for reading my little rockin’ story. Happy New Year!

  2. Love this, Cathy. I could picture it before I even saw your photo. Nice first try, indeed.

  3. Janice Bates

    Wonderful story Cathy. I have done a lot of needlework myself, so I can appreciate what your mother did. I am glad you have it, and more importantly, that you cherish it, both for it’s beauty and it’s history. It is things like this that make you such an amazing person. God bless.

  4. Sharon Owen

    Cathy, I love this story. I have some of my grandmother’s pieces of furniture in my home office, and I enjoy all of the memories associated with them. Sharon

    On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 8:10 PM Crafting Mysteries & Suspense wrote:

    > Cathy Elliott posted: ” The most meaningful antique my mother ever owned > was an 1800’s Lincoln rocker. First belonging to her great-aunt Nellie, > eventually it was inherited by my grandma. For many years, Mother > remembered watching her own mom rest and rock in the chair after a ” >

Leave a Reply to Cathy Elliott Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s